2018 Toyota C-HR

Buyer's Guide

Toyota’s jumped into the subcompact crossover game, but not in the way we expected this most mainstream of mainstream automakers to do so.

The designers behind the C-HR seem to have taken inspiration from the Nissan Juke, so similar it is to that bug-eyed tyke, at first glance. Sure, Toyota went with more conventional styling that better ties this small utility to the rest of the maker’s range, but the similarities between the two when viewed in profile are undeniable. Somehow, though, Toyota asserts the C-HR is unique in the compact crossover market.

Toyota calls the C-HR a crossover, and yet it left out one of the genre’s defining features in making this an exclusively front-wheel drive proposition. There’s also no manual transmission, a product planning decision no doubt inspired by a near-complete lack of interest in clutch pedals among crossover buyers.

The C-HR comes in a single trim that can be augmented with a premium package (more on that later) and a list of accessories, an approach that suggests this car is aimed at the same buying demographic as the now-defunct Scion sub-brand.

While the C-HR’s styling can keep up with that of the Juke, this Toyota’s 2.0L four-cylinder engine makes no such promises. It makes 144 hp and 139 lb-ft of torque, figures that pale next to those boasted by the Nissan’s turbocharged 1.6L. But hey -- not everything has to be a race, does it? Count on Toyota’s fuel consumption estimates of 8.7/7.5 L/100 km (city/highway) to be realistic.

One thing we can certainly appreciate about the C-HR is that Toyota has installed a useful and livable cabin inside the car’s extroverted body. Don’t expect a ton of interior space, but this is a five-seater, which enhances the car’s utility, and if the trunk is a bit small, well, the back seats fold down.

The lone XLE trim sells for $24,690 and comes standard with a seven-inch touchscreen display audio system, Bluetooth with voice recognition, dual-zone automatic climate control, colour multi-information display, heated front seats, 17-inch wheels and tires, heated side mirrors with integrated turn signal repeaters, LED daytime running lights, leather-trimmed steering wheel and shifter and a cargo area tonneau cover.

Also standard is Toyota’s Safety Sense P suite of active safety features, which includes pre-collision system with pedestrian detection, forward collision warning with automatic braking, lane departure alert with steering assist, automatic high beams and radar cruise control.

What’s missing is a blind spot monitor with rear cross traffic alert; while that feature usually marks the entry level for active safety in many vehicles, it’s part of the optional premium package ($26,290), which also bundles in 18-inch wheels with passive keyless entry with push-button start and power-folding side mirrors with puddle lamps that project the C-HR logo onto the ground.

2018 Toyota C-HR Specifications

There is 1 available trim for this model. View a specific trim for more precise information.
Overview
Specifications
From $24,690 MSRP
8.1
Fuel Economy City/HWY combined
144 hp @6100 rpm
Number of seats 5
Drivetrain Front Wheel Drive
Body style SUV
Trim MSRP Number of seats Body style
Trim Horse Power Torque Transmission Drivetrain
Trim Length Body Width Body Height Wheelbase
Trim AUX Input Satellite Radio MP3 Play Bluetooth Connect
Trim Standard Seat Trim Heated Front Seats Heated Rear Seats Power Driver Seats
Trim Traction Stability Brake Assist ABS Blind Spot Sensor
Trim Back Up Camera Parking Distance Sensors AC Power Windows Navigation
FWD XLE $24,690 5 SUV
FWD XLE 144 hp @6100 rpm 139 ft-lb @3800 rpm CVT Transmission Front Wheel Drive
FWD XLE 171.3" 70.7" 61.6" 103.9"
FWD XLE
FWD XLE Cloth Seats
FWD XLE
FWD XLE

News & Features

by Evan Williams
December 11, 2017
Driven wheels driving sales Read more
by Evan Williams
October 31, 2017
C-HReally fast! Read more
by Evan Williams
October 25, 2017
Toolbox joy Read more

Expert Review Articles

by Greg Wilson
November 21, 2016
Fortune favours the bold
by Peter Bleakney
April 07, 2017
Unencumbered by subtlety
by Dan Heyman
June 15, 2017
Controlled chaos
by Jacob Black
September 18, 2017
Honda HR-V vs Mazda CX-3 vs Nissan Qashqai vs Subaru Crosstrek vs Toyota C-HR
by Dan Heyman
November 30, 2017
Kicking it up a notch.

Owner Reviews: 2018 Toyota / C-HR

Average Rating

2008 Toyota C-HR

by shiloh on 06-29-2017
Great all weather vehicle
Powerful, comfortable ride, great storage, not most economical vehicle, but feel very safe riding in it. A definite go anywhere do anything kind of machine, and really a good long drive machine,very comfortable and at 110 cruising speed fairly descent on gas. I like that it,s basically built like a tank. can haul a tandem camper with ease and negotiate some of the roughest terrain, but a bit overpriced i have found.
Overall
4.0
Comfort
4/5
Performance
4/5
Fuel Economy
2/5
Interior Design
4/5
Exterior Styling
4/5
Reliability
4/5
Is this review useful?
Yes No
1 out of 1 found this review helpful.
Information or opinions expressed in these reviews are not endorsed by autoTRADER.ca
Have comments about autoTRADER.ca Owner Reviews? Send us an email

Nearby Vehicles

Vehicle Research

Search